Basketball 101: Triple Threat

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Brandon Williams
5 Star recruits have adopted the triple threat as their go-to move prior to going to work. Image by Popscout.

Teaching kids the fundamentals, at an early age, plays a huge role in the makeup of their game for years to come. Bad habits are truly hard to break. Acquiring coaches who understand the nuances of the game can sometimes be the turning point towards the success of a program. We’ve heard the cliches… but at the end of the day,  coaches who can motivate players and push the right buttons ultimately will have the greatest impact on these young student-athletes.

How do you, as a player, transfer what you learn in practice to game situations?

Popscout will begin to look at some fundamentals of the game we fell should be stressed a lot more.  We’ve been out and about family. We’ve had a chance to see some of the trends that are being set over the last 5 years. Which programs are truly buckling down and teaching the fundamentals of the game?  Unfortunately, not as many as we would like to see. The ingredients for success are always centered around character, hard work, and commitment. We get that. But it’s also boiling down to how many people you have on your staff, who truly understand the intangibles of the game, that can administer true fundamental knowledge to your players.


TVT-Coaching
TVT Coach demonstrates techniques during a timeout. Image by Popscout

Here’s a scenario for you to consider

The ball is being swung around the perimeter by the offensive team,  just to get the opposing/defensive team to move its feet.  As a player, program, and coaching staff, what’s the first thing you want your offensive player to do with the rock when he/she receives a pass?

1. Point to their parents in the stands and say look I got the ball.
2. Put the ball above their head and look to make a pass.
3. Begin to dribble the ball the second you catch it.
4. Catch the ball and get into a triple-threat stance.  Ready to pass, shoot, or dribble.

The answer is 4: Triple Threat.

The triple threat has to be taught as early as possible.  Programs must shy away from allowing their student-athletes to catch the ball without purpose – especially at an early age in their skill development and understanding of the game.  Programs must stress the value of the triple threat and begin to incorporate drills into the mix.

harveykitani_rhp-coach
Former Fairfax (Los Angeles) coach Harvey Kitani of Rolling Hills Prep has been teaching the game the right way for quite some time.  Popscout

3 Key Benefits of the Triple Threat for young players:

Allows players to handle pressure while also becoming ‘crafty’ with the rock.
Allows players to become an offensive threat – developing that killer instinct.
Lays down a standard operating procedure for your program to adopt.  Looks good when everybody is on the same page you feel me.


mater-dei-ship
Without high flying athletic studs, you must rely on the fundamentals of the game that are taught at an early age. Mater Dei players have benefited from learning the game the right way. Popscout

The triple threat should be a ‘safety valve’ mechanism.  Kids can rely on it to work their magic off the dribble. trying to beat pressure, as well as when the shot clock is running down.  Catch the rock, square up and look at the basket, all while getting into your triple threat position.  Ready to work your magic.

Make sure your program, coaches, parents, and players begin to incorporate triple threat drills into the equation.  Basketball 101 family.

Popscout
Elevate Yo’ Game

mater-dei
Brooke Demetre – who wears #2 this season, works out of the triple threat while surveying the court during the 2018 Matt Denning Hoops Classic. Popscout

 

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